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LFP Load File - Utilizing Image Rotation Setting


Cody Luera
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  • IPRO Employee

In Eclipse SE, recently encountered a scenario where the user wanted to auto rotate several images (all within a range) for multiple documents.

 

The images on disk were upside down, and the user wanted to rotate twice to make the images right-side up. While Eclipse SE does have a 'Sticky Rotate' option, using an LFP can be beneficial as well.

 

NOTE: Before performing any case-wide imports/changes, please ensure you have a backup/archive of the case created within the Case Utilities screen in Eclipse SE Admin.

 

Here is the workflow:

1. Create search for document images that you wish to rotate in Eclipse SE Desktop (can also be done in Admin)

2. Export LFP file from Desktop or Admin using the Export Data function. Do not check any additional features such as OCR, etc.

3. Edit the LFP load file to either add or remove the rotation option.

4. Overlay the load file using Overlay Only, and Overwrite But Retain Existing Annotations.

 

The breakdown of the LFP image line is as follows:

 

IM,[image Key],[boundary Flag],[Offset],[unique Filename];[Type],[Rotate]

 

Real world example: IM,ECL0000001,D,0,\\Network\Folder\Filename.tif;2,2

 

Definitions:

The [Rotate] piece indicates whether or not a preset rotation will be applied to the image within the Image tab in Eclipse SE Desktop. It does NOT alter the file on disk.

 

The values are as follows --

0 or nothing present = 0 degress

1 = 90 degrees

2 = 180 degrees

3 = 270 degrees

 

Note, if there is not a rotation value present in the LFP, it means no rotation value is applied.

 

These values can be added using a text editor. Upon re-import, Eclipse SE will recognize the rotation and apply it to the documents.

 

 

 

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  • IPRO Employee

In Eclipse SE, recently encountered a scenario where the user wanted to auto rotate several images (all within a range) for multiple documents.

 

The images on disk were upside down, and the user wanted to rotate twice to make the images right-side up. While Eclipse SE does have a 'Sticky Rotate' option, using an LFP can be beneficial as well.

 

NOTE: Before performing any case-wide imports/changes, please ensure you have a backup/archive of the case created within the Case Utilities screen in Eclipse SE Admin.

 

Here is the workflow:

1. Create search for document images that you wish to rotate in Eclipse SE Desktop (can also be done in Admin)

2. Export LFP file from Desktop or Admin using the Export Data function. Do not check any additional features such as OCR, etc.

3. Edit the LFP load file to either add or remove the rotation option.

4. Overlay the load file using Overlay Only, and Overwrite But Retain Existing Annotations.

 

The breakdown of the LFP image line is as follows:

 

IM,[image Key],[boundary Flag],[Offset],[unique Filename];[Type],[Rotate]

 

Real world example: IM,ECL0000001,D,0,\\Network\Folder\Filename.tif;2,2

 

Definitions:

The [Rotate] piece indicates whether or not a preset rotation will be applied to the image within the Image tab in Eclipse SE Desktop. It does NOT alter the file on disk.

 

The values are as follows --

0 or nothing present = 0 degress

1 = 90 degrees

2 = 180 degrees

3 = 270 degrees

 

Note, if there is not a rotation value present in the LFP, it means no rotation value is applied.

 

These values can be added using a text editor. Upon re-import, Eclipse SE will recognize the rotation and apply it to the documents.

 

 

 

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