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In Depth look at Persistent Highlighting


Michael Hadder
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  • Escalation Engineer

While working with Persistent Highlighting there are some key things to know regarding how to write out your terms to get the results you are looking for. Below are some important notes to remember when formatting your list of terms:

 

1. Persistent Highlighting is looking for an exact match. If the word is spelled differently in a document, then it will not highlight. Also only the provided variation of the word will be highlighted.

2. Persistent Highlighting does not highlight partial words. If your term is found in the middle of a larger word, then it will not be highlighted be default.

3. Asterisk (*) is the only supported wildcard. Using this character means that there might be other letters associated with the word, but will stop looking once it encounters white space.

4. Persistent Highlighting can highlight a phrase of words. To do this just make sure the whole phrase is on a single line. Using quotes will also force the search to find the quotes in the extracted text and may not find what you are looking for.

5. Persistent Highlighting does NOT use dtSearch to find the word, but DOES return the count of words. If you ever see the counts being incorrect, then rebuilding your dtSearch index should resolve that. However it is possible to use Persistent Highlighting without the dtSearch index for highlighting the terms.

 

Here are some examples to better illustrate some of these points. They are broken into the term that is being searched, then an example of something that would be highlighted, and finally something that would not be highlighted or would only be partially highlighted.

 

Term | "Example of what would highlight" | "Example of what won't highlight"

 

1. Example | "example" | "exemple"

-- spelling mistakes or alternative spellings are not highlighted

 

2. part | "PART" | "impartial"

-- partial words without *s will not work

 

3. *part* | "impartial" | "party people"

-- while party would highlight, the whole phrase would not highlight

 

4. This is a phrase | "This is a phrase" | "This is a different phrase"

-- If the whole phrase is located anywhere in the case it will be highlighted, but only if it matches exactly (or you are using the * wildcard correctly)

 

 

 

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  • Escalation Engineer

While working with Persistent Highlighting there are some key things to know regarding how to write out your terms to get the results you are looking for. Below are some important notes to remember when formatting your list of terms:

 

1. Persistent Highlighting is looking for an exact match. If the word is spelled differently in a document, then it will not highlight. Also only the provided variation of the word will be highlighted.

2. Persistent Highlighting does not highlight partial words. If your term is found in the middle of a larger word, then it will not be highlighted be default.

3. Asterisk (*) is the only supported wildcard. Using this character means that there might be other letters associated with the word, but will stop looking once it encounters white space.

4. Persistent Highlighting can highlight a phrase of words. To do this just make sure the whole phrase is on a single line. Using quotes will also force the search to find the quotes in the extracted text and may not find what you are looking for.

5. Persistent Highlighting does NOT use dtSearch to find the word, but DOES return the count of words. If you ever see the counts being incorrect, then rebuilding your dtSearch index should resolve that. However it is possible to use Persistent Highlighting without the dtSearch index for highlighting the terms.

 

Here are some examples to better illustrate some of these points. They are broken into the term that is being searched, then an example of something that would be highlighted, and finally something that would not be highlighted or would only be partially highlighted.

 

Term | "Example of what would highlight" | "Example of what won't highlight"

 

1. Example | "example" | "exemple"

-- spelling mistakes or alternative spellings are not highlighted

 

2. part | "PART" | "impartial"

-- partial words without *s will not work

 

3. *part* | "impartial" | "party people"

-- while party would highlight, the whole phrase would not highlight

 

4. This is a phrase | "This is a phrase" | "This is a different phrase"

-- If the whole phrase is located anywhere in the case it will be highlighted, but only if it matches exactly (or you are using the * wildcard correctly)

 

 

 

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  • Escalation Engineer

While working with Persistent Highlighting there are some key things to know regarding how to write out your terms to get the results you are looking for. Below are some important notes to remember when formatting your list of terms:

 

1. Persistent Highlighting is looking for an exact match. If the word is spelled differently in a document, then it will not highlight. Also only the provided variation of the word will be highlighted.

2. Persistent Highlighting does not highlight partial words. If your term is found in the middle of a larger word, then it will not be highlighted be default.

3. Asterisk (*) is the only supported wildcard. Using this character means that there might be other letters associated with the word, but will stop looking once it encounters white space.

4. Persistent Highlighting can highlight a phrase of words. To do this just make sure the whole phrase is on a single line. Using quotes will also force the search to find the quotes in the extracted text and may not find what you are looking for.

5. Persistent Highlighting does NOT use dtSearch to find the word, but DOES return the count of words. If you ever see the counts being incorrect, then rebuilding your dtSearch index should resolve that. However it is possible to use Persistent Highlighting without the dtSearch index for highlighting the terms.

 

Here are some examples to better illustrate some of these points. They are broken into the term that is being searched, then an example of something that would be highlighted, and finally something that would not be highlighted or would only be partially highlighted.

 

Term | "Example of what would highlight" | "Example of what won't highlight"

 

1. Example | "example" | "exemple"

-- spelling mistakes or alternative spellings are not highlighted

 

2. part | "PART" | "impartial"

-- partial words without *s will not work

 

3. *part* | "impartial" | "party people"

-- while party would highlight, the whole phrase would not highlight

 

4. This is a phrase | "This is a phrase" | "This is a different phrase"

-- If the whole phrase is located anywhere in the case it will be highlighted, but only if it matches exactly (or you are using the * wildcard correctly)

 

 

 

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Also, proximity searches within persistent highlighting will not function as you would expect. Each word is highlighted in a document weather the proximity constraint is met or not.

bob w/3 cat will result in all instances of each word being highlighted. The proximity operator is ignored and both terms are teated as separate persistent highlighting terms

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Also, proximity searches within persistent highlighting will not function as you would expect. Each word is highlighted in a document weather the proximity constraint is met or not.

bob w/3 cat will result in all instances of each word being highlighted. The proximity operator is ignored and both terms are teated as separate persistent highlighting terms

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